In the United States, whistleblowing is an accepted and even encouraged practice that is supported by laws to provide a safe harbor for those reporting wrongdoing, both within an organization and to public authorities. While Americans have had some sort of avenue to safely and anonymously voice concerns about corporate misgivings since the Civil War, whistleblowers have historically been much less common in the European Union (EU). All of that is about to change once the EU’s new whistleblower protection directive takes effect.

Posted In:


In SCCE’s Compliance & Ethics Professional magazine, Julia Arbery and Lisa Van Houten explain how compliance professionals can effectively prepare for the new EU whistleblower regulation. They also offer practical guidance to help companies provide standardize protections for those who report breaches of law.

Read the complete article .

About the Authors

Julia Arbery

Julia Arbery

Julia Arbery, a Managing Director with StoneTurn, has more than 15 years of experience in ethics and compliance. Specifically, she has focused on implementing effective ethics and compliance programs across […]

Read Bio

Lisa Van Houten

Lisa Van Houten, a Managing Director with StoneTurn, has more than eight years of combined experience in complex accounting, auditing, internal controls and compliance matters. Lisa has expertise in reviewing […]

Read Bio